The Professor: Training with Ronnie Smith

image 1-13-19 at 7.03 pm (1)Ronnie introducing a Wonder Lead to a young GSP at a seminar

“If I had just two minutes to listen to a dog speak their thoughts, it would be glorious, mind blowing,” remarked Ronnie and we watched 15 male pointers of every size and persuasion, pee, poop and play in his Stanford Montana play yard. “I would have to be prepared with my questions though.”

This was day three with Ronnie on my three-month Sabbatical Journey to learn from some of America’s best pointing dog trainers. Because of his renown and accomplishments as a dog trainer, speaking to Ronnie was my most anticipated visit in my quest to explore how great trainers live and work.

Ronnie did not disappoint.

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Ronnie Smith aka “The Professor” looking earnest

Although my gate doesn’t swing that way, I will admit now to a man crush on this humble, world class dog man who has trained thousands of bird dogs including National Champions. He is the youngest of a family of famous dog trainers. He was tutored by his father, Ronnie Smith Sr., who died young at 44 years of age leaving Ronnie to take the reins of Ronnie Smith Kennels at just 20 years old.  He was fortunate to be able to partner and be mentored by his Uncle Delmar and cousins, Tom and Rick, all dog trainer royalty.

He never mentioned his pedigree except to talk about the life and dog wisdom his father and Uncle Delmar passed on.  Ronnie remembered that his dad made him an official dog trainer at 8 years old when he was handed the shotgun to shoot the birds his dad was training.

An apprentice of Ronnie, Dave Bale of Side by Side Upland Bird Dog Training and retired University basketball coach headquartered in Salem OR said of Ronnie, “If dog training was D1 basketball, Ronnie is the legendary coach whose team is always in the Final Four.

image 1-13-19 at 7.04 pmRonnie working with multiple dogs and people at a seminar

After two days hunting Chukars with Dave, I drove my Airstream “Hi Ho Silver” from Eastern Oregon to Stanford MT. My legs were sore and my two French Brittany’s, Tex and Chaco completely done in.  12 hours of travel brought me to a classic Montana ranch, 7500 acres of grass, grain, sage, and coulees, perfect habitat for wild Sharpies and Huns, a magnificent finishing school yard for the 25 young dogs Ronnie and Susanna had brought to this spectacular Big Sky country.

image 1-13-19 at 7.02 pmRonnie, Reagan, and Gage watching a young dog hunting for wild quail along a creek bed at the 6666 Ranch in the Rolling Plains of Texas

Greeting me was Ronnie, his amazing wife and training partner, Susanna Love, and their adorable twins, Gage and Reagan. Susanna is the love of Ronnie’s life and the perfect partner to Ronnie’s laid-back Okie style.  Trained as an attorney and raised on a West Texas working cattle ranch, she is organized and driven.  Certainly, they are a dynamic duo whose strengths make the other better. Their adorable, well-mannered five-year-old twins participate fully in the care and training of the dogs. As one experienced with families and the raising of children, I can say these children are well raised and educated in a rich loving environment. Susanna like other great teachers I have worked with said she was inspired when “the light comes on” and the dog figures out the next step in their development. Susanna has the dog whisperer touch as well.  I watched her organize a dozen dogs in the play yard. All it took was a gentle word and the playful pointers attended to her and did her bidding joyfully. I saw the same response from Ronnie.

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Susanna working with a student to instill the concept of heeling on a loose lead and standing quietly beside the handler

In my head I nicknamed Ronnie, “The Professor,” because he understood and articulated the big picture of dog training. He explained three things better than any articles or videos I have read or watched.

FIRST, he explained that every interaction we have with our dogs puts our fingerprint on them.  Dogs are amazingly resilient (thank God I thought, considering the times I blew up and screamed at my dogs), but he went on to explain that each contact is a training situation where you can move the dog forward in its development as a bird dog and partner.

SECOND, Ronnie said, “our goal is to develop focus, prey drive, which is the key for a successful bird dog. All else, obedience, pointing style, running big is driven by the positive focus of hunting birds. Birds are key in building dogs and the experience must be positive.”  He used the example of coaching basketball to make point. “If you want your son to play basketball you give him the ball and say ‘have fun’; you don’t start him running suicides or dribbling drills.  You do that after he loves the game.”

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A young Ronnie Smith Kennel’s pointer finishing her training

Like my favorite Wheaton College education professor, Dr. Cliff Schimmel’s, who was also an Okie with a homey way of talking full of Jed Clampett like expressions, who inspired me to be an educational leader by focusing me on educational philosophy and the big picture of what happens in schools.  The same way Ronnie gets the big picture of everything his does with his dogs and the people who run them.  Dr. Schimmel’s would say, “education is people passing on the great ideas from one generation to the next in relationship, to be excellent you must know why you do everything you do.” Professor Ronnie, who had his PhD in dog training after decades in the business explained it, “maintain focus first, but keep it fun.”

The THIRD big picture insight was slightly subtler, quoting Delmar, he quipped in vernacular Okie, “you have to learn a dog to learn.” The dogs need to comprehend that you are in charge, directing them toward something they love and were born for—chasing game. “The early exercises and games are vital to teaching them the process of learning to be partners with you for life,” he explained.

“The best part of this experience in Montana is letting a dog discover his or her potential to cover ground and hunt,” he quipped. I saw this first hand as he allowed a gorgeous 7-month-old settler, Scout, to run huge for 3 hours over the country with no “whoas”, beeps, stimulation just a touch of encouragement, “alright boy” when he ran near him.

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Ronnie working dogs in some of the spectacular Montana landscape

At 56 Ronnie still loves this work and he and Susanna are constantly working to improve their system. “Dogs have changed” he explained, “they used to live outdoors in a kennel and were tools of the hunt. Now they live inside, pampered like a child, and often not given much in the way of limits. So, we must change our training format to help dogs with these new challenges.”

“Because I grew up as a bird dog trainer, I never realized that I chose this business until a woman asked me if I might quit one day.  It was the first time I realized that I had a choice. It is in my blood I think, and part of my destiny.”

Hanging with Ronnie and Susanna was inspiring and encouraging.  I realized that I had so much to learn about dog training, but I was glad to meet a couple on the front edge of the art of building great bird dogs.  I was pleased to be with people of such strong character and convictions. These were good Christian people with tender hearts toward God, his creation and a couple who understand that their gift in life was to help people create great relationships with their dog partners.

 

“Looks Like a Road Killed Skunk”

Interview with Leonard Hauser of Thunder Ridge Kennel

“Road Killed Skunk” were the words Leonard had for his favorite French Brittany Spaniel who was one the best bird dogs he had ever hunted behind.
Those were his first comments when we met my handsome dogs, Tex and Chaco. They were only mildly offended to have one of their breed compared to skunk but we soon discovered Leonard’s outspoken, old school character and generosity about dogs. “She could not have weighed more than 25 pounds but that little bugger could handle anything from ‘geese to grizzlies,’ steady as a rock on point, she would retrieve a goose or grouse. She was a dandy little dog.”

That was my introduction to Leonard Hauser as I stopped by to chat with him about dog training, bird dogs and visit his kennel and 600-acre training property. The kennel, Thunder Ridge Kennels, was a strong name and wonderful location just north a few miles outside of Billings Montana.  Cordial and full of stories, all I had to do was ask a question and he was off regaling me with accounts of great dogs, bad dogs and crazy people.

 Why do you do this?

“Well my dad was a wild-eyed bird hunter and I fell into it after Vietnam. For a while after the war I was an iron worker and cowboy, but I always had time to hunt birds.  There was no such thing as PTSD, so I guess my way of dealing with seeing 200 American soldiers, many some of my best friends, and thousands of Vietnam soldiers die violent deaths was to go outdoors.”

“I discovered I was good with dogs and when I found that people would pay me to hunt and work with their animals, I knew I had found brilliant fun.”

Leonard has trained over 1000 retrievers and 500 pointers in his 30 years of full-time dog training.  “Many became National Champions, but most are just great partners in the field.”

Tell me about dog psychology

“I learned I could read animals and know what they are thinking. There is no single way to treat animals. You have to figure each one out and help them from there. I believe in positive and negative reinforcement.  You start positive and then as they trust you, you can push them a bit more and require directed work from them.”

The Training Business

 With a twinkle in his eye he quipped, “I figure it is like the sheep business, you can shear them once or shear them for life. Not every dog is a hunter, many have not been exposed to birds soon enough, other dogs don’t have the temperament. I am clear and honest with my customers—once I have worked with their dogs, I tell them the truth about their dog’s future as bird dogs.”

Dog Breeds

 As Leonard walked through his kennel he commented in his direct and clear way on different dogs and breeds.  “For pointers, I love Shorthairs and many of the Pointing labs are great.  In fact, I have crossed them, and I call them Shorty Labs. The have great stamina, are good with heat and cold and run forever.  Several guides in North Dakota use them exclusively because they are so tough. I am not a fan of Wirehairs or Griffons because they have too much Airedale in them and they are not always birdy enough. Vizlas and Weimaraner’s can be great dogs too but aren’t has strong as Pointer or GSP’s.”

Summary Thoughts

I was only able to spend a couple of hours with Leonard but my summary thoughts were that this was a man who knew dogs, had a first-class training property with trees, grassland, ponds, and thick cover.  He told story after story of his hunting buddies, many of whom began as clients, and now were best hunting pals. He has built a strong business training dogs and kenneling mostly local hunting dogs. I loved that he spoke his mind and told the truth from his experience.  I would absolutely trust him with my dogs.  I actually encouraged my son, Lindsey III, who lives in Billings, and has a slightly untrained French Brittany, Monte, to have Leonard work with him to finish his training.

 

 

 

 

 

$20 dollars a month for one black dog– Bo Allen and Stealth Point Kennels

I loved bird hunting from a young age,” commented Bo Allen, owner and trainer of Stealth Point Kennels, as we sat inside his kennel room with dogs milling and whimpering in their runs.

I was visiting Bo near Meeteetse Wyoming, a town of 327 souls, as my first stop of a three-month Sabbatical from my position as President/Head of Menaul School, a small independent day/boarding school in Albuquerque New Mexico with my three partners: Tex and Chaco, my energetic French Brittany Spaniels and Hi Ho Silver, my 2005 26-foot Airstream, my home away from home. I am visiting great dog trainers across the US to find out what makes them tick and chasing wild birds along the way.

Bo explained further, “I’ve always tried to make my hobbies into my careers. I bought a pointing Lab from a local breeder and paid $20 a month for most of my high school years.  It was the best dollars I ever spent.”  He also told how he fell in love with golf at 21 after toying with college studies and then became a golf pro for five years.

Stealth Point Kennel sits in the rolling grassy hills as part of the Leigh Ranch, a beautiful ranch of dusky sage, brown grasslands and emerald irrigated alfalfa fields. He has great training in his front yard and three kennels full of 40 or so dogs.  He lives in an old ranch house with his very pregnant wife and 5 of his own dogs. His focus is breeding, raising and training his own Pointing Labs and German Wirehairs but trains all breeds.

Training Systems

Bo does not use any particular system for training but gets to know the dog and tries to meet them where they are at. “If there are two types of trainers, program and non-program trainers. I am in the non-program camp. I try and work with dogs from their needs in light of their readiness.”  He sounded just like many of the master teachers I have been graced to work with over my own 37 years in schools, who within their subject matter and class objectives teach students first and the curriculum second.

Training

 In two hours of watching Bo train, I saw him work his own form of magic. From helping a four-month-old black Lab get turned on to birds to helping a gun-shy yellow Lab named Trump to reinforcing woah to a 14-month-old Wirehair by putting a e-collar on his waste to stop him from creeping on a point. He even helped me put my sensitive 13-month-old pup, Chaco, onto birds. In each case Bo was patient and warmly approached by each dog.  The best example was the way he worked with the gun-shy, Lab, Trump.  He used no pressure and despite the dogs fear he worked hard to please Bo.  The dog retrieved but then headed right to his kennel.  Bo only used positive words with this dog. All the dogs approached him comfortably with appropriate tail wagging and ears back.  Clearly here was a teacher who knew to build rapport first and to teach the lesson next.

Bo explained his educational psychology to me. “Dogs learn through associations. For example, we try and have them associate the bang of a gun with a bird flying.  With my gun-shy dog, Trump, the gunshot makes him anxious because as a young pup someone took him goose hunting before he knew to associate a shot with birds. Fixing him is a major undertaking and there is less than 50/50 chance of success.” But unlike his namesake, this Trump will make a good housedog.

The second concept was more dynamic.  “Every drill must give the dog purpose and for gun dogs, it should be about the birds first, then obedience.” Bo demonstrated this as a client, Dave, an effusive, retired petroleum cowboy with a big personality, an Oklahoma twang and two spoiled Labs.  Bo coached Dave as much as the dogs about practicing what they did here at training. The Chubby four-month-old, Fancy, gobbled up thrown dead birds and did not flinch at shots fired over his head. The 14-month-old non-pointing Lab eagerly booed up the planted Chukars and retrieved a killed bird to hand. The once a week session were going to create great hunting companions for Dave who quipped, “we will have to hunt a bunch because I can’t shoot worth a dam anymore and the dogs might get frustrated.”  Dave was as proud as a peacock as he watched his dogs perform under Bo’s tutelage.

Final Impressions

My lasting impression of Bo and Stealth Point Kennels is that Bo is a real dog man.  When he explained that the kennel name is for his best pointer, Izzi, a Wirehair, who pointed with intensity and stealth, the pride is his voice and light in his eye told me that this man lived for and loved his dogs.  I found in him a real teacher who I would be happy to have teach my own dogs.

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